The Center for Basic Needs Assistance offers an integrated and comprehensive response to the most critical issues facing people with low income in our community.

CBNA’s goal is to address economic insecurity among members of the Jewish community and beyond throughout Eastern Massachusetts. Our services are lifelines that help people feed their families, heat their homes, keep roofs over their heads, adjust to changes in the family, assist immigrants, and so much more. We give people the tools they need to make positive changes and become self-sufficient.

Our team of 20 staff members crafts a unique and individual response to each family’s personal needs. By integrating a set of core services under one roof, we help our clients meet their basic needs for food, housing, fuel, utilities, and more.

When your family needs a helping hand, CBNA is ready to offer dozens.

“I just wanted to reach out and say thank you. I can’t tell you what a help you have been. Even just having someone to talk to that understood everything that is going on was such a weight lifted off my shoulders. I still have a million things on fire and I deal with so much alone so having someone help me with the biggest fire is priceless to me and I won’t forget it."

- A client who received financial aid

Emergency Financial Assistance

Comprehensive resources for people facing the challenges of living on a low income.

Family Table Food Pantry

New England's largest kosher food pantry.

Bet Tzedek Legal Services

Pro bono legal services and benefits.

Schechter Holocaust Services

Support and resources for the hundreds of Holocaust survivors in the Greater Boston area.

Journey to Safety - Response to Domestic Abuse

Services for domestic abuse survivors.

Services for the Russian Speaking Community

Resettlement, post-resettlement, and citizenship assistance.

Income eligibility and other criteria apply, with the exception of Journey to Safety.

For more information, call 781-647-JFCS (5327) or email your questions via our contact us page.



This program is funded in part by CJP.